The Slog

Probably the most powerful shot in cricket, the Slog is performed with the intention of obtaining a boundary (a four or a six). The Slog is most commonly played in one day cricket, particularly in the last five or ten overs of the day, when batsmen play more aggressively in a last attempt to increase runs.

The Slog has little regard for technique, but uses a fast powerful swing across the line of a long ball with the aim of hitting the ball high into the air. A way of increasing the power of the shot is by ‘advancing down the track,’ when the batsman takes two or three steps down the pitch before making contact with the ball. The Slog is directed between mid-wicket and long-on, also known as cow corner (so named because balls are rarely hit that far, meaning cows could, in theory, graze safely in that part of the field!)

Whilst the Slog can gain high scores when performed powerfully and accurately, it is also more risky than other shots because the batsman is more likely miss the ball and risk being bowled out. There is also a high chance of getting out by Leg Before Wicket (when the ball hits any part of the batsman before the bat) and, if the ball is not hit hard enough to clear the field and score a boundary, it is likely that a fielder will have time to move under the ball and catch the batsman.

The Slog Sweep is the name given to a more aggressive version of the Sweep Shot. Like the Sweep, it is played on one knee across the body but unlike the ordinary Sweep the batsman hits the ball high into the air, rather than rolling the wrists to keep it low to the ground.

The Slog

The Slog