• Innings. The teams agree beforehand on how many innings will be played and if either or both of the teams will be restricted by time or over limits and what these limitations will be. In two innings games the sides bat alternately unless the follow on law is enforced (see next law) The captain that wins the coin toss elects to bat or bowl first. The end of an innings is reached when a) all batsmen are dismissed b) no further batsmen are fit to play c) The innings is declared or forfeited by the captain d) The agreed time or over limit has been reached.
  • Follow on. In a match of two innings, if one side scores far fewer runs than the other side the side that batted second can be put in to bat again immediately. The margin of runs that the side batting first need to be ahead by to make the other team ‘follow on’ varies with the length of the match. For example in a five day match the side batting first needs to be ahead by 200 runs to make the other team follow on; For a three or four day game it is reduced to 150 runs, for a two day game 100 runs and for a one day game 75 runs. The length of the game depends on the number of scheduled days play left when the match actually begins.
  • Declaration and Forfeiture. An innings can be ended by the batting captain when the ball is dead. The captain can also forfeit the innings before it begins.
  • Intervals. Because cricket matches are extremely lengthy there are many breaks at different stages of the match. These breaks could occur between a) The end of each day and the start of the next b) The end of an innings and the beginning of a new innings c) Intervals for lunch or tea d) Intervals for drinks. The extent of these intervals and the duration of play for each day are agreed upon before the coin toss. An exception to the law is when nine wickets have fallen when the set time for tea has been reached, in such circumstances the break is delayed till either that wicket is taken or 30 minutes elapsing, whichever is earlier.
  • Beginning and end of play. After an interval, play begins with the umpire’s announcement of ‘Play’ and the session ends with the announcement of ‘Time’. Like the ‘kick off’ in other sports the very first ball of the days play is called the ‘ball off’. At least 20 overs have to be bowled on the final hour of the match, the final hour may even be extended to fit in this number.
  • Using the field for practice. The pitch cannot be used for practice except before the beginning and after the end of a day’s play. Umpires allow bowlers to do trial run ups only if it does not cause